Professional Squirrel Removal

How to Get Rid of Squirrels

There are several species of squirrel, but tree squirrels are the most common nuisance for homeowners because they inhabit attics and garages and cause damage. They often gnaw on the exterior and interior walls, timbers, cables, and electric wiring. They have been known to short out electric power transformers due to their activities around power lines. Squirrels are typically discovered because they make a lot of noise in the area they inhabit. The gray squirrel is the most common structure-infesting squirrel species.

Squirrels are abundant in the wild because their numbers far exceed the number of predators. The large population and decreasing natural habitat due to construction in many areas cause them to seek shelter in houses. The chilly months of fall and winter cause squirrels to seek the warmth that is found in attics.

Squirrel Control Recommendations

Removal of any diet source: bird seed for example, because they attract the squirrels is the first order of business.

Using gutter guards and covering downspouts will reduce the number of squirrels that are entering through the rooftop and facia boards.

There are no poison baits on the market that squirrels will eat and die, except Ditrac Ground Squirrel Bait that is only made to control the California Ground Squirrel (found in western states). Typical rodent control bait for mice and rat control will not work against other squirrels.

Live trapping method of trapping squirrels is the only way to remove unwanted squirrels. Catching a squirrel is really the only way to get rid of squirrels in your attic, once they have chewed holes. It is important to seal up and repair all entry points after trapping the squirrels, so they no longer have access.

Trapping Tips

Always use work gloves when handling the traps with a squirrel inside.

Some trappers like to use a technique called “pre-baiting” to gain the squirrel’s confidence. Leave the trap out, wired open (so it won’t shut) with the bait so that they can get used to the object in their environment. However, most of the time this technique is not needed to trap squirrels successfully.

Place traps where you hear or see the activity. Using a Rat/Squirrel lure (walnut/nut oil based) on a cracker or piece of fruit behind the trip pan is very helpful as a lure. You may also try peanut butter. Next use sunflower seeds on top of that and trail a line of sunflower seeds out the front door of the trap so that there are “free” seeds a couple of feet in front of the trap. This will help overcome any anxiety the squirrels may have about entering the trap.

Exclusion and Relocation of Squirrels

After trapping and relocating the squirrels you can seal the openings with 1/4″ mesh hardware cloth or metal flashing. Look for all possible entry points. If you are not handy with tools, many nuisance wildlife control companies will seal entry points with a year’s guarantee for a fee.

 

TIPS FOR HOW TO GET RID OF SQUIRRELS IN THE YARD

Squirrels can be a nuisance in the yard or garden by eating fruit, vegetables and birdseed and chewing tree bark. Squirrels also have a way of making their way into your attic or crawlspaces and setting up nests. Here’s how to get rid of squirrels in the yard and keep them out of your home.

Don’t feed them. If you feed them, they will come. Any food found in your yard is fair game for roaming creatures or those already calling your property home. When you’re hanging bird feeders, scattering plant seeds or throwing compostable food scraps into your garden, you create the opportunity for easy meals. You should weigh your enjoyment of bird watching with the potential to attract pests with uneaten birdseed.

Remove what attracts them. The sight and smell of fallen fruit, nuts and seeds lures squirrels. Rake your yard regularly to remove these items from under bird feeders and trees. Use garbage cans with tight-fitting lids to keep squirrels out of your trash.

Scare them. A dog or cat may keep squirrels out of your yard, particularly if your dog chases squirrels. If you don’t have a cat or dog, you can place plastic owls around your property on elevated surfaces such as fence posts or the roof to frighten squirrels away. You can also buy containers of predator (wolf or tiger) urine to spray in your yard or garden. The scent scares many animals, including squirrels, deer and rabbits. You need to re-apply the solution after it rains.

Spray them. Motion-activated sprinkler systems may help keep squirrels out of your yard.

 

How To: Get Rid of Squirrels

Most of the time, squirrels are completely benign, but in some situations, they can cause considerable damage. If you want to put an end to your squirrel problem, don’t miss our five-point action plan.

Don’t let the bushy tails fool you. They may be cute and and bright-eyed, but if left unchecked, squirrels can do an impressive amount of damage, not only to your garden, but also to your home (particularly the attic and eaves). While there’s no quick and easy way to get rid of squirrels, you can do a number of things to slowly shoo away these mischievous creatures. Whether you’re responding to an existing squirrel problem or seeking to prevent one, read on for a five-step action plan.

Focus on food.

If the neighborhood squirrels seem to be more interested in your house than in the one next door, it only makes sense to investigate the reason why. First things first, scan your property for an obvious food source, such as a bird feeder. Even if mounted on a tree or atop a pole, bird feeders are well within reach of squirrels, agile animals capable of jumping eight to ten feet with relative ease. If not going to go great heights in search of food, squirrels are just as likely to dig for it. Garden bulbs, in particular, are vulnerable. In lieu of protecting your flower beds with chicken wire, consider planting strategically placed daffodils. Since these perennials are poisonous to squirrels, they act as effective deterrents.

Prevent passage.

Everyone knows that squirrels are expert climbers. What you may not have realized is that, by banding tree trunks with plastic or metal collars (sometimes known as baffles), you can prevent squirrels from progressing along those routes that afford access to vulnerable areas, such as the overhang of your roof

Opt for odors.

To augment your other efforts, hang ammonia-soaked rags on the branches squirrels seem to favor. Doing so has proven moderately successful for Lindsay Wildlife Museum in Walnut Creek, CA. Alternatively, you can purchase and spread predator urine, available for sale at garden supply stores or home centers. The downside is that such treatments must be reapplied after every rainfall.

 

How to Get Rid of Squirrels

Squirrels are funny animals; however, despite the cute looks they have gained a reputation of the well-known pests. The pair of jittery squirrels can grow into an entire army of invasive pests and inhabit your property for a long time. This guide explains how to get rid of squirrels fast. Here you’ll find two best ways of controlling squirrels approved by scientists and 10 best products to help you succeed in eliminating your scurry nuisance.

The squirrels literally damage everything they can reach and repairs can get pricey. These curious and naturally inquisitive animals feel fine on your territory all year long. They feed on bird seeds, damage vegetables, and fruits, destroy your favorite flowers, and turn everything upside down in the attic

Start with the area outside your house. It is easier to chase squirrels away from your backyard rather than from the attic or any other space indoors, where rodents usually nest. Remove foodstuff: all fallen fruits, nuts, and other debris from the backyard to reduce food availability for squirrels. Tightly seal garbage cans. Trim the trees and shrubs adjacent to the house and avoid planting new ones, otherwise, their branches will turn into a perfect bridge to your house.

Inspect your house for any openings and cracks in the structure. Seal them with foam insulation or use metal mesh. If squirrels have already established their nests in your house, wait until they leave for hunting and only then block all access points. When applicable, build a fence extended 12 inches below the ground level, so that squirrels can’t get underneath.

Since the attic is a prime target for squirrels, clean it up: remove any garbage and foodstuff if you store it there.

 

How to Get Rid of Squirrels

They dart across the street, scurry up trees, and claw their way through small openings in homes and buildings. Squirrels are among the most widespread rodents in North America, one of the family that includes chipmunks, marmots, and prairie dogs

They have a benign, almost cute appearance with their bushy tails, short arms and legs, and pointed ears. But they can wreak havoc within the walls, crawl spaces, and attics of homes in search of shelter. As they move about, they can even harbor infected fleas and ticks that may transfer diseases.

Gray Squirrel

Though helpful in some ways to the environment, gray squirrels can be quite a pest in highly populated areas. When tree cover isn’t available for a habitat, gray squirrels will seek out telephone poles and roof lines. If they gain entry to the interior of your home, they will claw or chew at electrical wiring and wooden supports, leading to structural damage or even a power outage.

Red Squirrel (Pine Squirrel)

The smallest of the tree squirrels (but larger than chipmunks), this species is known for its territorial behavior. This species is most often home in wooded areas dotted with pine trees.

Fox Squirrel

This is the largest species of tree squirrel. With sharp claws and athletic bodies, fox squirrels are natural climbers and will spend most of their days in trees. During that time, they search for food ranging from nuts and flowers to insects and small birds. Fox squirrels build their nests during summer and endure the winter inside trees.

Pest Control Wasps Or Bee

Getting rid of wasps the right way

The best way to remove a wasp nest is contacting a pest control professional. It may seem like an easy job, but a pest control expert is professionally trained to handle and remove wasp nests in a safe and efficient manner, and here’s why:

  • Safety equipment: An exterminator has access to personal protective equipment (PPE) and respiratory protective equipment (RPE). This fully protects them from wasp stings, ensuring their safety when removing a wasp nest
  • Working in small spaces: Pest specialists are trained and qualified to work in small spaces such as your attic. This allows them to successfully remove a wasp nest safely from a property.
  • Expert knowledge: A pest control professional has expert knowledge on wasps; they know all about their behavior and instincts as well as how to identify the signs of an allergic reaction to wasp stings.
  • Professional products: Wasp exterminators have access to, and are professionally trained to use a variety of pest control products not available to the public. These products are more powerful than any DIY products on the market and have a proven track record of successfully removing wasp nests.

 

How To Keep Wasps From Building Nests Around Or In Your Home

Like we mentioned above, food is a key motivator for wasps when it comes to choosing where they might build their nest. To ensure they don’t do so, it’s imperative to remove any unwanted food or drink around your property and to keep your trash cans and trash areas covered and tightly sealed. More specifically, though, since wasps are drawn to sweeter foods, you may want to consider removing nectar and bird food that you may have intended for other animals if your priority is keeping wasps away.

If you are on a wasp control mission, another consideration is your home’s structure. As we mentioned above, queens find cracks and holes in your home during the colder months to ensure a secure and a warm place to hibernate. To avoid attracting additional queen wasps, be sure to repair any broken panels or siding, patch cracks in walls and repair any additional crevices you find on both the interior and exterior of your home. In your lawn, consider filling in any holes—occupied or vacant—with dirt or debris. Doing so will keep a wasp colony from making and building their home in a burrow.

 

Wasps: How to get rid of a wasp nest in your home according to pest control expert

WASPS are a dangerous pest to have in your home, bringing the risk of painful stings. An expert reveals how to get rid of a wasp nest from your home. Wasps in the home can cause misery and fear for property owners. If you experience a huge influx of wasps, it is likely you have a wasp nest and will be keen to learn how to get rid of it.

This could be in a often uninhabited part of your house, for instance in your loft. Alternatively, it might be on the side of your roof. A scratching or crackling noise could be a sign wasps are making a nest in your home. Wasp nests cause damage to your property, because they are produced by wasps chewing wood materials in your home into pulp.

 

Why Wasps Go Dormant

Although they are a fearful flyer for those who don’t enjoy the stinging insects, wasps will leave once they know their stay is no longer tolerated. This takes some work on your part to give them their walking papers without causing serious injury to you or them. Wasps will go dormant once the nest is no longer viable. There are many ways to adios unwanted wasps near the spaces where you, children or friends and family gather. If you spray the nest with soapy water at a safe distance wearing protective clothing at night, you can render the nest useless. Once a nest is useless, the wasps will go dormant, and it is safer to remove the entire nest so that the wasps know not to return to your wasp-intolerant abode.

 

How to Get Rid of Wasps in Roof Vents

Wasps cause problems when they build nests in or around your home. They will defend their territory and get aggressive if you get too close to a nest or try to disturb them. Roof vents are attractive to wasps because the vents are covered and therefore offer protection. If wasps aren’t dealt with as soon as they start nesting, an infestation becomes a greater risk. Getting rid of wasps in roof vents requires diligence to make sure they don’t return.

Step 1

Spray an insecticide into the vent to kill any wasps that are currently in the vent. Wear a breathing mask and follow all instructions on the package to prevent inhalation. Spray at dusk when the wasps are more likely to be dormant inside the nest.

Step 2

Cover the vents with plastic bags for several days to prevent more wasps from going into the system.

Step 3

Check your attic for openings that the wasps could be using to get into the vents. Breaks in the insulation or small holes in the wood are common sources for wasp entry. Any breaches require sealing to prevent more wasps from entering. Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants to help protect against stings.

Step 4

Call a professional if the wasp problems continue because stings could be dangerous, especially if you’re allergic to them.

The Right Pest Control For Wasps

Wasps

Wasps are grouped into two categories: social wasps and solitary wasps. Social wasps (i.e., yellow jackets, bald-faced hornets and paper wasps) live in groups, defend their nests and take care of their young together. Solitary wasps (i.e. mud-daubers, cicada-killers, spider wasps, and potter wasps) form individual nests; act non-aggressively unless provoked; and sting to paralyze their prey (flies, caterpillars, spiders, etc.) and to defend their nests.

Paper wasps ( Polistes exclamans ) are ¾-1″ in length and have a slender, spindle shaped abdomen. They are long-legged and variously colored (yellow, brown, black and/or red). Paper wasps prey upon various garden pests. However, they do sting in defense of their nest.

Yellowjackets ( Vespula spp. ) are smaller (½-¾”) and much stockier than the paper wasp. They have black and yellow, banded markings on the abdomen. Yellowjackets designate members of their colony to defend the nest and are more aggressive than paper wasps. Colony guards can be disturbed by even the slightest vibration and will defend the nest vigorously and may call upon other members of the colony to attack.

Bald-faced hornets ( Dolichovespula maculata )are also slightly smaller (½-¾”) than a paper wasp. They are stockier than yellowjackets and are black with white/ivory markings on their face, thorax, and the tip of their abdomen. Bald-faced hornets aggressively protect their nest and also assign guards to guard the colony.

Wasp Removal Near Me

Our local pest control solutions are designed to get to the root of your concern and gets rid of typical pests while also stopping new ones from turning up. We focus on offering year-round insect control services in homes, commercial buildings, and other grounds in nearby areas. We perform pest control services to get rid of wasps and other aggravating pests. Our wasp control specialists are trained to utilize the most sophisticated pest-control technology and are committed to deliver trusted, quality service. Whatever your reason for trying to find pest control solutions , we are committed to delivering efficient solutions that are safe for your house, family, pets and the environment, so you will not have to be concerned about there being adverse effects to your pest control experience.

 

Identifying Wasps by Physical Characteristics

Look for yellow and black. Identify Yellowjackets and European paper wasps by the yellow and black bands on the wasps’ abdomens. Cicada killers are a type of digger wasp that resembles a larger, wider yellowjacket. Identify the European hornet by its yellow and black striped tail and red-brown thorax. You’ll also see black and yellow mud daubers.

Identify wasps with other coloration. Paper wasps native to North America are golden brown with patches of red and yellow. Distinguish these from the baldfaced hornet, which is white and black striped with a white face. Also look for digger wasps, which have orange-brown, yellow and black bodies and metallic blue wings.

Estimate the wasp’s size. Look for 0.5 inch (1.27 cm) long yellowjackets. Contrast these with larger wasps, including the 0.75 to 1.2 inch (1.9 to 3 cm) long baldfaced hornets, 0.75 to 1.4 inch (1.9 to 3.5 cm) long European hornet, and the significantly larger 1 to 2.5 inch long (2.54 to 6.35 cm) tarantula hawks and 1.5 inch (3.81 cm) long cicada killer. Paper wasps and mud daubers tend to be 0.5 to 0.75 inches (1.27 to 1.9 cm) long.

Observe the body shape. With some rare exceptions — like the European hornet — wasps can be identified by their smooth, hairless bodies and narrow waists. Learn to recognize the yellowjacket by its short, narrow waist and cone-like abdomen that tapers to a sharp point. Look for the characteristically long legs and spindle-shaped waist of the paper wasp. Also note the mud dauber has a very narrow waist and long, thin body.

Neutralize Nests Naturally

Nests are easiest to locate on warm summer mornings or evenings by carefully scanning the landscape for insects shooting up out of the ground. After you have located yellow jacket nests, decide whether they will stay or go. To neutralize a nest without using pesticides, cover the entry hole with a large translucent bowl or other cover, held in place with a brick. Be sure to approach yellow jacket nests at night, when the yellow jackets are at rest. Use flags or other markers to mark the locations of nests in acceptable places.

WHEN it’s a warm summer day, there’s nothing like a picnic or barbecue in the sunshine.

But for many outdoor eating can quickly become a bit of a nightmare at this time of year with the buzzing sound of a wasp heading your way.

Wasps are normally natural pest controllers and tend to eat other insects.

During August and September their attentions turn to sweet food making them much more of a nuisance.